The summer season is approaching!

Ahoy! I have had a busy week and have a nice restful day of bellringing on Guernsey to look forward to tomorrow so it’s time to relax and write an Alderney update.

So, what have I been up to in the last month?!

Pretty much everything really: exploring Alderney, butterfly and bumblebee surveying, reserves jobs including finishing off the new Longis Birdhide and maintaining footpaths, tractor cutting, a few bat and hedgehog walks, beach cleans, more ormer hunting, helping set up for puffin season and for the first time today, leading a cycle tour of the island.

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Sharing the white sands and azure seas of the Mediterranean Channel with visitors on a cycle tour this afternoon.

The weather for the last few weeks has been glorious. It’s been sunny almost every day although often the air and wind have been pretty cold. I’ve had my first sunburn of the year and have got out exploring and being shown new places with fellow AWT staff members 🙂 There are two new secret places which we visited in particular which I loved – The ruined Cachliere pier and Bluestone beach. Bluestone is the islands “nudist” beach as it is hidden from view and again hard to find unless you know how. The blue/grey pebbles get lovely and warm in the sun and there and huge wave smoothed boulders of sandy coloured stone to sunbathe on. It’s a lovely swimming beach and the beach drops off steeply so it gets very deep quickly. I had my first swim on 2017 here a couple of weeks ago – it was very cold! We warmed up in the sun afterwards with a hot cup of tea before heading off to lead a beach clean in the afternoon.

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The ruins of Cachliere pier viewed from the approach above
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It’s great to explore and hard to find unless you know the way down!
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We enjoyed a classy glass of prosecco and enjoyed the warm evening and the different view
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The descent to Bluestone beach.

 

Survey season has well and truly begun, I have two weekly butterfly transects to walk and a monthly bumblebee transect. Ideally these should be done on warm, sunny and calm days, we’ve definitely had the sunny but not necessarily the warm and calm!

Here is one of my survey sites a couple of weeks ago – not may butterflies there!

I also see some other interesting things along my transects like this:

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Mucilago crustacea also charmingly known as Dog’s Vomit slime mould

I do love a slime mould! They are a bizarre single celled organism that most of the time live freely and independently. When conditions are right and they meet mating partners, they grow into a ‘plasmodium stage’ of a mobile slimy mass of interconnecting strands. This mass moves over the food source until it runs out which triggers spores to be produced. The plasmodium stage of many species can be very distinctive but is ephemeral and you will only usually see it for a day or so before if darkens, produces spores and the remains dry up.

I’ve encountered a fair number of different insect species in the last few weeks so I have a separate post coming on those – sorry, like the moths this will be more for my benefit than yours!

In the meantime have some photos of Alderney sunrises and sunsets:

 

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